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Ohio Wesleyan Alumnus to Discuss Infectious Disease Impact on U.S.
Herbert L. DuPont, M.D., OWU Class of 1961, Researches Public Health Implications

September 7, 2010

Dr. Herbert DuPont ’61.
Photo courtesy of the Associated Press
DELAWARE, OH – The infectious disease issues affecting developing regions of the tropical and semitropical world have a direct impact on the United States and other industrialized countries, says renowned medical researcher Dr. Herbert DuPont. Because of widespread travel and immigration, as well as living conditions in some areas of the United States, infectious diseases “are the world’s problems, and they are ours in the United States,” DuPont says.

DuPont will discuss “Emerging Infectious Diseases – Is the U.S. Now a Developing Country?” at 4:10 p.m. Sept. 20 in the Benes Rooms of Ohio Wesleyan University’s Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave. His international research focuses on the epidemiology, immunology, clinical features, control, prevention, and therapy of selected infectious diseases with public health implications. His presentation also will be streamed live and archived afterward at StreamOWU.

DuPont, a 1961 Ohio Wesleyan graduate, is listed in “The Best Doctors in America” and “America’s Top Doctors: the Nation’s Leading Medical Specialists.” He serves as a consultant to both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is chief of internal medicine at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, director of the Center for Infectious Diseases at the University of Texas School of Public Health at Houston, and vice chairman of the Department of Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. He helped found the International Society of Travel Medicine, has authored or co-authored more than 600 scientific publications, and written or edited 19 books. He also received the 2009 TIAA-CREF Distinguished Medical Educator Award.

DuPont’s Ohio Wesleyan presentation is co-sponsored by the Sagan National Colloquium, the OWU Science Lecture Series, and the Dr. Ellen Dickinson Medical Science Symposium, which annually highlights an outstanding physician or research scientist. The Dickinson symposium was founded in memory of the late Ellen Dickinson, M.D., OWU Class of 1963, who trained in neurology and psychiatry and taught at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. She also worked at the Erie County, Pa., Medical Center.

Other 2010 Sagan National Colloquium lectures include:

  • 7 p.m. Sept. 21 – Cawo Abdi, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota, presenting “ ‘Xenophobia’ or Generalized Violence: Migration to Post-Apartheid South Africa.” Her current research focuses on transnational relations among East African migrants. Abdi’s presentation will be held in the Benes Rooms, Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave.
  • 7 p.m. Sept. 27 – Saba Fatima, OWU Class of 2002, presenting “Muslim American Political Identity.” Fatima currently is completing her doctoral degree at the State University of New York (SUNY) Binghamton in social, political, ethical, and legal philosophy. Fatima will speak in the Benes Rooms, Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave. This event will be streamed live and archived afterward at StreamOWU.
  • 7 p.m. Sept. 30 – Patrick Cronin, D.Phil., senior adviser and senior director of the Asia-Pacific Security Program for the Center for a New American Security, presenting “Comprehensive Approaches to Global Security.” Previously, Cronin served as director of the Institute for National Strategic Studies at National Defense University and as director of research at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Cronin will speak in the Benes Rooms, Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave. His presentation is co-sponsored by OWU’s International Studies Program. This event will be streamed live and archived afterward at StreamOWU.
  • 4 p.m. Oct. 8 – Gloria Steinem, internationally known women’s rights advocate and Ohio native, discussing “Women, Activism, and Change on a Global Level.” Steinem co-founded both New York Magazine and Ms. Magazine, and helped to found the Women’s Action Alliance, the National Women’s Political Caucus, and Choice USA. She was the founding president of the Ms. Foundation for Women and helped create “Take Our Daughters to Work Day.” Her most recent projects have focused on issues of sex trafficking and indigenous rights. Steinem will speak in Gray Chapel in University Hall, 61 S. Sandusky St.
  • Noon Oct. 11 -- Wanjiru Kamau-Rutenberg, Ph.D., assistant professor of political science at the University of San Francisco, presenting “The Politics of Gender and Global Philanthropy.” Her research and teaching interests include the politics of gender, global philanthropy, international development, ethnic politics, transitions to democracy, and the role of communication technology in social action. She is the founder and executive director of Akili Dada, an international nonprofit organization working to ensure that the next generation of Kenyan women leaders includes women from disadvantaged economic backgrounds. Kamau-Rutenberg will speak in the Benes Rooms, Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave.
  • 7 p.m. Oct. 20 – Kennedy Walibora Waliaula, Ph.D., assistant professor of African languages and literature at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, presenting “Political Incarceration and the Literature of Postcolonial Disenchantment.” Waliaula is a prolific Kiswahili fiction writer and has won the Kenya’s Jomo Kenyatta Literature Prize twice for his Swahili texts. Waliaula will speak in the Benes Rooms, Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave.
  • 7 p.m. Oct. 27 – Bruce Dickson, Ph.D., professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University, discussing economic and political change in China. Dickson currently is examining the political consequences of economic reform in China and, in particular, the relationship between private entrepreneurs and the Chinese Communist Party. Dickson will speak in the Benes Rooms, Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave. His presentation also serves as OWU’s 2010 John Kennard Eddy Lecture on World Politics.
  • 7 p.m. Nov. 1 – David Carruthers, Ph.D., associate professor of political science and Latin American studies at San Diego State University, presenting “Environmental Justice and the Politics of Pollution on the U.S.-Mexico Border.” His research focuses on environmental politics and policy, particularly in Mexico and Latin America. His presentation will be held in the Benes Rooms, Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave.
  • 7 p.m. Nov. 4 – Terry Collins, Ph.D., professor of chemistry at Carnegie Mellon University, presenting “Green Chemistry: Sustaining a High-Technology Civilization.” His laboratory group’s research focuses on designing environmentally friendly oxidation systems. The group’s discoveries offer promise for improving the environmental performance of the pulp and paper industry as well as impacting water purification, the textile industry, and the laundry and cleaning industries. Collins will speak in the Benes Rooms, Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave. His presentation is co-sponsored by the OWU Department of Chemistry.
  • 7 p.m. Nov. 9 – Altha Cravey, Ph.D., associate professor of geography at the University of North Carolina, presenting “Mexican Mobilization and Diaspora.” Her research is focused on Latin America and Latinos in the United States South, and she is the author of “Women and Work in Mexico’s Maquiladoras.” Cravey will present in the Benes Rooms, Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave.
  • 7 p.m. Nov. 17 – Christopher Zalla, film and television producer, writer, and director whose credits include the 2007 Sundance Grand Jury Prize winner “SANGRE DE MI SANGRE,” screening the documentary “Home is Where You Find It,” which he co-produced with Alcides Soares, a 16-year-old AIDS orphan from Maputo, Mozambique. The film was created as part of a non-profit collaboration pairing master filmmakers with youth ages 8-21 from around the world to create short documentaries that educate Americans about globally relevant issues. His presentation will be held in the Benes Rooms, Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave.

Ohio Wesleyan University is one of the nation’s premier small, private universities, with more than 90 undergraduate majors, sequences, and courses of study, and 23 Division III varsity sports. Located in Delaware, Ohio, just minutes north of Ohio’s capital and largest city, Columbus, the university combines a globally focused curriculum with off-campus learning and leadership opportunities that translate classroom theory into real-world practice. OWU’s close-knit community of 1,850 students represents 45 states and 52 countries. Ohio Wesleyan earned a 2009 Presidential Award for Excellence in General Community Service, is featured in the book “Colleges That Change Lives,” and is included on the “best colleges” lists of U.S. News & World Report and The Princeton Review. Learn more at www.owu.edu.